Boundary Eco and Forest School

 

What is Forest School?

Forest School originated in Scandinavia and was brought to the UK in the early 1990s. Sessions are always child led (to foster independence), long term (to build trust and relationships) and outside (to gain the many physical and emotional benefits from being in nature). The Forest School ethos aims to promote students’ confidence, social skills, sense of self-worth and emotional well being in an outdoors environment.

Children are not directly taught but are encouraged to find things out for themselves through play i.e. games, stories, creative expression and sharing. Through play, the child develops their initiative and imagination (problem-solving), learns resilience and resourcefulness (perseverance and determination), how to give and ask for help and support from peers (emotional intelligence and teamwork), and how to appropriately self-manage risk in an increasingly risky world.

 

 

What happens in Forest School?

Activities are provided during a forest school session but the emphasis is on the children choosing what they do. Activities might include den building, log transportations, cutting firewood and fire building, crafts such as making a dream catcher or clay creatures, group games, flora and fauna ID as well as stories and collaborative activities.

The obvious benefits of improved coordination and physical health from doing activities outside are enhanced by opportunities to develop imagination and initiative; problem-solving and perseverance. Children are encouraged to try things out and learn from experience, rather than rigidly following a set of instructions. This often involves learning how to work as a team to get something done, feeling comfortable with asking for and offering help and learning how to cope with failure or setbacks. These are seen as important skills to take with them into the adult world.

 

Meet Jenna Benson!

At Boundary, we are lucky to our own Forest school practitioner Jenna, who has been with us for nearly a year now.  Before Jenna was a practitioner for outside learning she was a park ranger for four years. When asked what impact Jenna feels Forest school has on children, she said;

“Forest school is important for a child’s emotional intelligence and well-being. What’s important for a child’s development is what the additional nature-experience gives us, in respect of awareness, mobility and space to learn. Children gain more structure to handle their emotions and grow in the ability to cope with unusual situations and reflect on their own head space. Outdoor leaning allows for better communication, gives them the extra space to gain skills which would be beneficial for survival in more ways than one.”

Thank you Jenna for implementing this opportunity for our children.  

 

If you go down to the woods today…

If you go down to the woods today…

...you may find Holly and Willow Class! On Tuesday and Wednesday, we travelled to Salisbury Woods to see what they looked like in Autumn. We noticed "lots of leaves everywhere" and they were "all different colours...orange, yellow, brown and red". It was a bit chilly...

Family learning in Nature

Family learning in Nature

The children and parents were Nature Detectives. Parents learnt ways to support their child's reading. writing and maths with a Nature theme. They learnt how to support learning at home and in school and each family made a scrap book to record their learning. Parents...

The One Where Year 6 Do Forest School!

The One Where Year 6 Do Forest School!

Wow - what a day we had during our forest school session! We started off our session by gathering the resources around the outdoor area to create a spooky structure (Halloween style). We had to work in groups to show our team-building skills and we had to use our...

The Eco Brick! How to make one.

The Eco Brick! How to make one.

Choose a bottle. This is really important because you need to get the perfect bottle to build the perfect Ecobrick. The key thing to think about is size. Any size bottle will work as an Ecobrick, but the average size tends to be between 500ml to 1.5l. You should also...

Excellent Eco!

Excellent Eco!

Every half term, children in Boundary will be learning about an area of Eco. Eco is short for ecological which means the relations of living organisms to one another and to their physical surroundings. Year three's theme this half term was Climate Change. Children...

Look at our classroom!!!!!!!

Look at our classroom!!!!!!!

When we came back into class after lunch we had a shock .... our classrooms looked like this!!! It was 'horrible', 'dirty', 'full of rubbish' and 'a mess'. What had happened??? Miss James and Mrs Hopwood had done an experiment to show us what the world would be like...

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